Redbanded Stink Bugs Successfully Overwintered In MS

Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist
By Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist, Don Cook, Research Entomologist and Jeff Gore, Research and Extension Entomologist May 31, 2017 13:44

Redbanded Stink Bugs Successfully Overwintered In MS

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In 2009 Redbanded stink bugs (RBSB) were treated in numerous areas of the state but numbers crashed in 2010. In 2013 there were a few fields treated and then they essentially were a non-issue until 2016. We have been hearing for years the horror stories about this pest from the farmers and consultants in Louisiana. Until 2016 growing season, We never really had an appreciation for their damage potential in soybean. We heard all the stories, but seeing is believing and believe me when I tell you everything we heard is true. RBSB is a different critter than our traditional species (Green, Southern Green and Brown Stink Bugs). I personally witnessed fields with tremendous yield loss.

Redbanded stinkbug are more aggressive feeders than our normal stink bug complex and re-infest fields much quicker after treatments. Because of this, the threshold was reduced from 9/25 sweeps to 4/25 sweeps for this species. In areas were RBSB are plentiful it takes a more aggressive approach to manage this insect and they must be managed until the combine hits the field.

2017 Expectations:

RBSB’s are very sensitive to cold winters. Cold winters typically kill them back to the coastal areas of LA. When RBSB pose a threat to MS, it is typically after mild winters where they overwinter further north. Unfortunately, RBSB have overwintered well north of Hwy 82 this year. We have been finding adults and immatures for a couple of months in ditch banks. Does this mean we are certain to have issues this year? Nothing is ever certain with insects. However, the stage is set for this insect to be an issue this year, maybe more so than ever before but time will tell. We already have had numerous reports of RBSB being found in low numbers in blooming soybean this year. Never have we found them so early in the year in MS. We will continue to monitor this situation and will keep you informed of anything that develops. We will be reporting regularly on the status of this pest throughout the season.

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Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist
By Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist, Don Cook, Research Entomologist and Jeff Gore, Research and Extension Entomologist May 31, 2017 13:44
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