Events Calendar

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Not all Boll Rots are caused by Bacterial Blight

Boll rot as a result of Fusarium (as indicated by the pink growth of fungal structures on the boll).

Boll rot appeared to be a common occurrence in numerous cotton fields at the end of the 2014 season. However, not all boll rot can be attributed to bacterial blight, especially in situations where the disease was not observed prior to harvest. Secondary fungal infection can ultimately obscure the observable boll symptoms associated with bacterial blight. Keep this in mind when scouting fields at the end of the season as bacterial blight boll lesions can oftentimes be obscured by secondary fungal invaders. . . . → Read More: Not all Boll Rots are caused by Bacterial Blight

2014 Preliminary Rice Variety Trial Data

StLeveeRice

Find below the Preliminary version of the 2014 Small Plot Official Rice Variety Trial. During 2014, small plot rice variety trials were conducted near the following locations; Choctaw, Clarksdale, Drew, Hollandale, Shaw, Stoneville, and Tunica. Variety trial data is presented segmented by technology,  conventional or Clearfield. As of current only rough rice yields are presented, milling . . . → Read More: 2014 Preliminary Rice Variety Trial Data

Late Season Potash Deficiency in Cotton

late potash 2

The evolution of cotton cultivars has led to higher yield potentials and shorter growing seasons compared to the historical full season cultivars favored in the Mid-South.  These newer, faster fruiting cultivars may require more nutrients than older outdated cultivars.  Recently, across the Mid-South, many consultants, state extension and research specialists have observed numerous cases of potash . . . → Read More: Late Season Potash Deficiency in Cotton

Keys to Diagnosing Common Nutrient Deficiencies in Rice

Potash Deficient Rice

Described below are the most common nutrient related issues that occur in Mississippi rice production and a few distinctive characteristics to key on when trying to properly identify each issue in the field.  Nutrient issues in rice can take on many appearances, but coupled with field histories some of the keys below will aid in identification.  . . . → Read More: Keys to Diagnosing Common Nutrient Deficiencies in Rice

Rice Stink Bugs in Mississippi Rice

As more and more of the rice crop starts to head, it is time to start thinking about rice stink bug. We have been sweeping some grass around the Delta for the last few weeks, and the one general comment I will make is that populations have been fairly low in most areas. We have seen fairly high numbers in a couple places, but it was small patches of heading grass in isolated locations. . . . → Read More: Rice Stink Bugs in Mississippi Rice

Rice Leaf Blast Confirmed in Mississippi

Typical symptomology of rice leaf blast

Typical symptomology of rice leaf blast

Last week’s weather pattern in the Delta provided near perfect conditions for rice blast (Pyricularia grisea) to occur.  Rice blast is generally categorized by the plant part infected (e.g., leaf, neck, panicle).  Blast favors mild humid weather, frequent rainfall, and extended periods of leaf wetness.  On susceptible cultivars, yield loss . . . → Read More: Rice Leaf Blast Confirmed in Mississippi

Scouting Cotton for Bacterial Blight in 2014

Bacterial blight of cotton can produce several different symptoms on plant parts.  Leaves, bracts and petioles all can exhibit symptoms of the disease.

Once again, bacterial blight has been observed in the MS cotton crop. At present, several fields in the south and north Delta as well as a single field in east MS have been observed to contain bacterial blight infected cotton leaves. To date (July 8, 2014), a single cotton variety has been reported to be infected in all fields. . . . → Read More: Scouting Cotton for Bacterial Blight in 2014

Armyworms in Rice, Again!

It appears that 2014 is going to be the year of the armyworm in rice. I have had numerous calls, texts, and Tweets about armyworms in rice over the last week. If you have not had them in your rice to this point, consider yourself very lucky. . . . → Read More: Armyworms in Rice, Again!

Economic Benefits of Properly Managing Multiple Inlet Rice Irrigation

With water being one of the most expensive inputs of the rice producer, utilizing methods to limit the amount of water used makes economic sense.

Figure 1.

Adoption of multiple inlet irrigation has allowed producers to reduce water consumption. Water use with multiple inlet has translated into an 18% (fig.2) reduction in water cost over straight levee . . . → Read More: Economic Benefits of Properly Managing Multiple Inlet Rice Irrigation

Diagnosing Nutrient Deficiencies in Mississippi Soybeans

Soybean K 3

Diagnosing nutrient deficiencies is not rocket science, but can be cumbersome.  Many nutrient related issues occur early in season and can sometimes mimic herbicide injury in appearance.  In many instances it is difficult to tell the two apart. Most often nutrition related issues can be confirmed with a properly taken tissue test and corrected with an . . . → Read More: Diagnosing Nutrient Deficiencies in Mississippi Soybeans