Spider Mite Update and Recommendations

Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist
By Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist June 17, 2011 08:28

Spider Mite Update and Recommendations

Spider mites have been becoming more widespread over the last two weeks.  Currently we have quite a few acres that have required treatment for spider mites and several that have already received 2 applications.  The hot dry weather we have been dealing with for the last couple weeks is making the problem worse, and the numerous thrips applications this year has further led to the increased problems with spider mites by removing beneficial insects early.  With no rainfall in many parts of the state, mite populations can explode quickly.  Over the last few years we have treated mites before bloom in some areas of the state but this year it seems much more widespread.  One of the problems with having to treat spider mites in small cotton is none of the miticides available are systemic, so all new growth is unprotected.  This often leads to multiple applications.

 Suggestions for treating mites on small cotton:

  1.  Don’t wait until you have lots of symptomology occurring.  If you are finding scattered mites across the field or moving in from field borders treat before symptomology becomes widespread.
  2. Use high water volumes and correct nozzles.  Coverage is essential when treating mites.  Use hollow cone nozzles with high PSI or Flat Fan tips.  Do not treat mites with low drift tips.
  3. All of the miticides in the table below have proven to be effective in controlling mites.  However, in small cotton that will likely require additional treatments I would stay cheap in actively growing cotton.  There are huge price differences in miticides, and given that new growth is unprotected, whether the product cost $6.00 or $25.00 it will still likely require another treatment if more mites move into the field and colonize unprotected tissue.  As cotton begins to slow growth into bloom, rotate in other products.
  4. Adjust rate depending on pressure. If mites are heavy use higher rates.
  5. Don’t create your own problem.  Acephate and pyrethroids are notorious for flaring mites.  Hold these products as long as you can before applying.
  6. Rain will help reduce mite numbers but will not make them go away.  It will simply buy you a little time. 
  7. READ Labels.  I was not able to get all details about the products in the tables.  Please read the labels for additional information.
Miticide Amount of Formulation per Acre Pounds Active Ingredient per Acre Acres 1 Gallon or 1 lb Dry Will Treat Comments
abamectin   Agri-Mek 0.15 EC

   ABBA 0.15 EC

   Zoro 0.15 EC

 4.27 – 16 oz

4.27 – 16 oz

4.27 – 16 oz

 0.005 -0.0188

0.005 -0.0188

0.005 -0.0188

 30 – 8

30 – 8

30 – 8

Spreading and Penetrating surfactants can improve mite control
bifenazate   Acramite 4 SC  16 – 24 oz  0.5 – 0.75  8 -5.3 pH of water should be 5.5 -6.5
bifenthrin   Brigade 2 EC

   Discipline 2 EC

   Fanfare 2 EC

 3.84 -6.4 oz

3.84 -6.4 oz

3.84 -6.4 oz

 0.06 – 0.1

0.06 – 0.1

0.06 – 0.1

 33.7 – 20

33.7 – 20

33.7 – 20

Will require repeat applications.Bifenthrin has performed more consistently mid to late season
dicofol   Dicofol 4  1.0 – 1.5 qt  1.0 – 1.5  4 – 2.67 Usually requires repeat applications
etoxazole   Zeal 72 WSP  0.67 – 1 oz  0.03 – 0.045  24 – 16 Use only one application per season
fenpyroximate   Portal  6 – 32 oz  0.0188 – 0.1  2.1.3 – 4 No more than 2 applications per season
propargite   Comite II 6  20 – 36 oz  0.94 – 1.68  6.4 – 3.55 Do not use penetrating surfactantsDo not use on cotton under 12 inches tall

REI is 13 Days

spiromesifen   Oberon 4 SC  3 – 8 oz  0.94 – 0.25  43 -16 Most effective when applied toward egg and nymphal populations
*List is not all inclusive   **Always read label

 

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Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist
By Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist June 17, 2011 08:28
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