Mississippi Rice Progress – June 20, 2013

Tim Walker, Agronomist
By Tim Walker, Agronomist June 20, 2013 15:19

As of the week ending June 16th, USDA reported that Mississippi was 100% planted and 99% emerged.  The later planted rice is progressing rapidly which is good.  As we are experiencing more seasonal temperatures, rice will continue to progress rapidly.  In my experience, it usually only takes about 2 to 3 weeks to reach the flooding stage after emergence for June planted rice.  Midseason is approaching for some of the crop, and I expect much more of it to be at or near internode elongation in the next 10 days.  As a reminder, rice is extremely susceptible to glyphosate drift once panicle initiation occurs.  We have struggled through a lot of drift to vegetative rice this year, and the last thing we need is drift during the reproductive stage.  Please be vigilant in communicating with neighbors and commercial applicators where rice is located.  Please use discretion when applying glyphosate and other herbicides that negatively impact rice yield and quality.  Symptoms of glyphosate drift onto rice in the reproductive stage are almost non-existent until the rice heads.

I have summarized the USDA Crop Progress Report for Mississippi (June Planting Progress).  As is depicted in the chart, there is a lot of rice we now call “Late” relative to recent years.  Historically, May and June planted rice is not as productive as April planted rice.  However, we have had years where rice planted in late May has been as productive as April rice.  The productivity of a majority of this year’s crop will depend on the weather we receive in August and September.  Let’s all hope and pray that we have good weather to finish this crop.  Certainly, it has been the most difficult in my young career to manage.  What can we expect with respect to maturation of this crop?  Based on research information and 30 year weather history, rice planted during a more normal time frame (April to Mid-May) usually takes 30 to 35 days from 50% heading to harvest maturity.  Average daily accumulated heat units decline quite rapidly after the first week of September according to the 30 year normal weather patterns in Stoneville.  Thus, for rice planted after early to mid-May, the days from 50% heading to harvest maturity can exceed 50 days depending on the variety and the weather.  Every day in the field during the fall months, you are at risk to be exposed to adverse weather conditions that can be very costly to yield and/or quality.  As we manage this late crop going forward, it is essential to manage it to not unnecessarily increase the days to maturity.  Experience tells me that flood timing contributes to the number of days to reach maturity, so I would push rice to flood as quickly as you possibly can.  Secondly, excessive nitrogen can delay maturity.  Rice planted in June will not have optimum yield potential.  Don’t try to push the rice to yield more with excessive nitrogen.  This can backfire causing up to several more days for maturity in the end.

Please note that the Rice Field Day will be held Tuesday, June 30 in Stoneville.  Registration will begin at 2:30 at the Capps Center.  A representative from Mars, Inc. will be our feature speaker at 3:00.  Tour wagons will be loaded and depart at 3:40.  We look forward to hosting you in Stoneville to highlight the rice research efforts.

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Tim Walker, Agronomist
By Tim Walker, Agronomist June 20, 2013 15:19
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