Bollworm Flight Later Than Normal But Now Starting

Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist
By Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist, Jeff Gore, Research and Extension Entomologist and Don Cook, Research Entomologist July 19, 2013 15:38

Usually in Mississippi the major bollworm flight coming off of corn usually ranges from June 25-July 7th on average. We started getting our first calls out of the south Delta this week. Many consultants are reporting scattered worms and eggs in cotton and moths being flushed in cotton and soybean. Likely in the next 7-10 days we will be making many sprays in both crops for above threshold numbers. Although the flight is a couple weeks late, it’s now arriving. The lateness is likely due to the lateness of the corn crop. Whatever the reason, its starting and we need to be monitoring fields closely.

Soybeans: A large percentage of this crop is very late and will be very susceptible to bollworm damage. Bollworms can slip up on you fast in soybeans that are only scouted once per week, so watch closely. Threshold is 9 per 25 sweeps. Pay particular attention to soybeans that are blooming and planted in wide rows. Pyrethroid insecticides are no longer first choice products due to lack of consistent control over the last several years. Products of choice are: Belt, Besiege, Prevathon, and Steward.

Cotton: Although nearly all of the cotton is BGII or WideStrike (WideStrike will likely trigger before BGII and should be watched closely), it is still very important to scout and make applications if necessary. Threshold in MS is 4% larvae or 2% boll damage with larvae present. I have already had one report of 15% live larvae in bloom tags with numerous eggs present in some BGII cotton. In Delta areas where plant bug applications are going out in blooming cotton, the addition of a pyrethroid to and organophosphate insecticide greatly improves plant bug control and provides a cheap insurance against bollworms. Remember, scout bloom tags closely. This is where infestations will occur, if it occurs.

We will keep updates coming. For instant updates from the field follow us on Twitter: @acatchot, @jeffgore99, @doncook6.

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Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist
By Angus Catchot, Extension Entomologist, Jeff Gore, Research and Extension Entomologist and Don Cook, Research Entomologist July 19, 2013 15:38
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